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Elbow Replacement Specialist In Pune

With a team of highly skilled elbow replacement specialists and a state-of-the-art facility, we at Polaris Healthcare provide exceptional services in elbow surgery. From the initial consultation to post-operative care, we strive to provide compassionate and comprehensive care that places our patients' well-being at the forefront.

Elbow Replacement Specialist In Pune

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Types Of Elbow Problems

Elbow About

Tennis elbow aka lateral epicondylitis

Tennis elbow, medically known as lateral epicondylitis, is a condition characterised by inflammation of the tendons that facilitate the movement of your wrist away from your palm. Tendons are firm bands of tissue that connect muscles to bones, and the specific tendon primarily affected in tennis elbow is the extensor carpi radialis brevis. This condition is commonly observed in individuals aged between 30 and 50, irrespective of gender.

Tennis elbow aka lateral epicondylitis
When to go for elbow replacement surgery

When to Go for Surgery

Elbow surgery may be recommended when non-surgical treatments have failed to alleviate chronic elbow pain and limited range of motion. Conditions such as severe arthritis, traumatic injuries, and other degenerative conditions may require elbow surgery to improve joint function and overall quality of life. A thorough evaluation by our medical professional is conducted to determine if surgery is the best course of action and which type of surgery is most appropriate depending upon the individual's condition.

Golfer elbow aka Medial epicondylitis

Golfer elbow aka Medial epicondylitis

Golfer's elbow, also known as medial epicondylitis, is a condition that involves the inflammation of the tendons that attach to the inner side of the elbow. These tendons facilitate the movement of your wrist and fingers toward your palm. Similar to tennis elbow, a golfer's elbow is caused by repetitive stress, but it occurs on the inner part of the elbow instead of the outer part. The specific tendon typically affected in the golfer's elbow is the flexor carpi radialis. This condition is commonly observed in individuals who use their wrists and hands for gripping and swinging, such as golfers, pitchers, and tennis players.

Students elbow aka Olecranon bursitis

Student's elbow, also known as olecranon bursitis, is a condition that involves inflammation of the bursa located at the tip of the elbow. A bursa is a small fluid-filled sac that provides cushioning between bones, tendons, and muscles, reducing friction during movement. Olecranon bursitis is commonly observed in students who spend long hours writing and resting their elbows on a hard surface, leading to repetitive trauma and irritation of the bursa. Other factors, such as trauma, infection, or certain medical conditions, can cause olecranon bursitis.

Students elbow aka Olecranon bursitis
Fractures around elbow

Fractures around elbow

Fractures around the elbow occur when one or more bones in the area surrounding the elbow joint are broken or cracked, typically due to trauma such as a fall onto an outstretched hand or a direct blow to the elbow. Symptoms of a fractured elbow may include pain, swelling, stiffness, and difficulty moving the affected arm. Treatment for elbow fractures depends on the severity and location of the injury. It may involve immobilisation with a cast or brace, medication for pain and inflammation, and surgery to realign and stabilise the broken bones in severe cases. Physical therapy and rehabilitation exercises may also be necessary to restore the affected arm's range of motion and strength.

Radial tunnel syndrome

Radial tunnel syndrome is a condition that occurs when the posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) in the radial tunnel becomes compressed, leading to pain without any accompanying motor or sensory issues. The radial nerve is responsible for numerous arm movements, such as forearm rotation, elbow extension, and wrist and finger movement. As the nerve passes through the radial tunnel, a collection of muscles, it can get pinched or compressed, resulting in unwanted pressure on the radial nerve and nagging pain. Treatment for radial tunnel syndrome typically involves conservative measures, with surgical release of the radial tunnel reserved for severe or persistent cases.

Radial tunnel syndrome-min.jpg
Ulnar nerve Palsy -min.jpg

Ulnar nerve Palsy

Ulnar nerve palsy or ulnar neuropathy is a condition that occurs when the ulnar nerve, which runs from the shoulder to the little finger, is damaged. This nerve manages the muscles responsible for fine movements and gripping things tightly. Injuries to the ulnar nerve are not uncommon, and when they occur, they can cause loss of sensation and muscle weakness in the hand. In severe cases, the condition can cause muscle wasting or atrophy, leading to the hand resembling a claw. Surgery may be necessary to correct this condition and restore the hand's function.

Elbow replacement surgeries

Total Elbow replacement

Elbow replacement surgery is a surgical procedure where the damaged parts of the elbow joint are replaced with an artificial joint made of metal and plastic components. There are two types of elbow replacement surgery: partial elbow replacement, which replaces only one part of the joint typically the head of the radius bone, and total elbow replacement, which replaces the entire joint including the humerus, ulna, and possibly the head of the radius bone.

Total Elbow replacement
Radial head replacement

Radial head replacement

Radial head replacement surgery is a procedure that is typically performed on a patient's elbow following a complex fracture to the radial head. In situations where fixation with screws or plates is not feasible or appropriate, replacement surgery may be recommended. During the procedure, the damaged bone and joint surface of the radius are removed, and an artificial implant made of metal, plastic, or a combination of both is used to replace the radial head. The goal of the surgery is to restore the stability and mobility of the elbow joint and alleviate pain and other symptoms associated with the injury. Recovery time for this surgery can vary, and physical therapy is often necessary to help patients regain strength and mobility in the affected arm.

FAQ'S

1. When to go for elbow replacement surgery?

Elbow surgery may be recommended when non-surgical treatments have failed to alleviate chronic elbow pain and limited range of motion. Conditions such as severe arthritis, traumatic injuries, and other degenerative conditions may require elbow surgery to improve joint function and overall quality of life. A thorough evaluation by our medical professional is conducted to determine if surgery is the best course of action and which type of surgery is most appropriate depending upon the individual's condition.

2.  What are the procedures involved in an elbow replacement surgery? 

Elbow replacement surgery involves implanting prosthetic components to replace the damaged bones of the elbow joint. These components consist of two metal stems connected by a metal and plastic hinge, allowing the prosthetic joint to flex. The procedure is performed under general anesthesia and may require a short hospital stay. Physical therapy is often necessary for recovery and rehabilitation.

3. What post surgery care should one follow for a successful recovery?

Following post-surgery care instructions is crucial for a successful recovery after elbow replacement surgery. The instructions are listed below,

  • Have a nap when you feel fatigued.

  • Try to go for daily walks.

  • Avoid intense activities like bicycling, running, weight lifting, or aerobic training until your doctor gives you the all-clear card.  

  • If your doctor gives the go-ahead, you can shower 24 to 48 hours following your procedure.

  • Find out from your doctor when you can resume driving.

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